HOT RIT 20hr

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HOT RIT 20hr

350.00

Jan 12 & 13 at the Frederick County Fire Academy, Frederick, MD.

Skill Stations 

  • SCBA Confidence

  • Assessing and Packaging Unconscious FF

  • Applying the RIT mask to an unconscious FF 

  • Moving a FF to safety

  • Denver Drill

  • Removal through a window

  • Firefighter through the floor 

  • Long Term Air Supply

  • FF CPR

More specific information below…

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The importance of a ready and capable rapid intervention crew/team is paramount to firefighter safety on the fire-ground. But are we approaching the Mayday scenario appropriately? 

Many times, in the firefighting industry we are drawn into the latest and greatest in gadgets and gizmos. Unfortunately, on the fire-ground, technology can fail us just as fast at is came into our lives. With this in mind, the importance of training in our skillset to the worst-case scenario cannot be understated. This goes for both basic and advanced fire-ground skills. 

Over the years fire service has unknowingly handicapped firefighters by limiting RIT training to the concept or idea that the rescue starts from the outside. Why? Because we have based our mindset on one unfortunate LODD back in 2001 and the study completed thereafter. While this study was a breakthrough for its time, lending us much needed information and ideas, it did not solve all of our problems. A lost FF and a trapped FF will not necessarily require the same response. Our RIT mindset must be based off of real-world data. Thankfully, this information now exists. Through Project Mayday light has been shed on why FF’s are calling Mayday’s and how they were handled, both in success and failure. Approximately 57% of Mayday’s are called by the first rig on-scene and 55% of the time that rig is an engine company. The three leading causes of Mayday’s are Falls into a basement (20%), Falls through or off a roof (19%), Disoriented & lost/separated from crew or hose-line (19%).

Looking at who is actually making helps us understand how to be better. The majority of Mayday’s are fixed by self-rescue (32%)! An interior crew is responsible for the rescue 54% of the time! This leaves the outside RIT responsible for only 7-8% of rescues! So why are we training our people to start from the outside? Outdated information. 

This aggressive 2-day class will take this information, along with data and recommendations from multiple studies and teach the skills, both physical and mental, we believe will be the most needed during a Mayday event. One specific study is the Fairfax County Fire After Action Reviewof their 2016 Mayday/RIT study. 

Each day will begin with about 1 hour in the classroom to discuss the material being covered. We will also discuss the mindset of RIT on the fire-ground. Are we approaching the Mayday scenario properly? What is the true mission of the RIT? Why does most of our training include the idea of RIT starting from the outside? Can interior crews act as the first RIT? These questions and more will be examined. 

 This hands-on training course is filled with the skill building needed to ensure you are ready to be both effective and efficient should the time come. One of the biggest reasons for a skill failure in the IDLH is lack of practice and comfortability in zero visibility. The Fairfax studymentions, “Additionally, members who seemed comfortable in the zero-visibility environment moved faster and were more effective.” In this class we will spend time letting you work through skillsets from a low stress environment with visibility, where acquiring the skill is the goal, to a higher stress atmosphere matching the complications of the fire-ground. 

 Day 2 will wrap up with large scale and demanding RIT evolutions allowing the class to practice and demonstrate their skills and knowledge. As the USMC Decision Making Student Handbook states, “…training and experience is paramount. Repetitive training, rehearsals and experience allows for faster recognition of key variables that will drive one towards a particular decision.” This program will deliverthe next best thing to an actual Mayday and help provide the repetitive training and experience described above. 

 Skill Stations 

  • SCBA Confidence

    • Approximately 15% of Maydays are called due to air problems. 46% of them due to low air and 18% due to no air. This comes back to SCBA confidence and knowing your and your equipment’s capabilities.

    • SCBA confidence is paramount to operating effectively inside the IDLH. Two skill stations will be devoted to confidence in your SCBA system. Within these stations you will learn and practice the Riley Breathing Technique, EBSS connections under stress and visualization of your system under zero visibility.  

  • Assessing and Packaging Unconscious FF 

    • The unconscious firefighter must be positioned in a way to allow rapid assessment but also protect their spine as much as possible. This is best achieved by positioning the victim in a sitting position, supported by a rescuer sitting behind the victim. In this position the unconscious firefighter can be assessed and evaluated. 

    • Any form of packaging which includes an extra piece of equipment, i.e. Reeves, Backboard, Mega Mover, SKED®, usually results in delayed removal times due to the limited visibility and very limited training with these devices. We preach a Keep It Simple approach teaching the simple but successful technique of converting the waist strap into a harness. 

  • Applying the RIT mask to an unconscious FF 

  • Moving a FF to safety 

    • Simple moves 

      • Lifts, drags and moving up and down stairs. We promote a Keep It Simple Stupid (KISS) philosophy. Our movement techniques are based off of best practices discovered through tough training and real-world RIT operations. We will not rely on equipment brought in from the outside (backboards, Reeve’s, mega-movers, SKEDS, etc.) as these devices have a high rate of failure due to user error under stress and limited visibility. 

    • Complex moves 

      • Denver Drill

      • Removal through a window

        • Conventional

        • Cut Down

        • Rapid Ladder A-Frame

  • Firefighter through the floor 

    • Part 1: Attacking the Fire 

    • Part 2: Removing the FF

  • Long Term Air Supply

  • FF CPR